+86-15169331170    sales@kimachemical.com
NEWS
Home / News / Exploring the Electrospinning Potential of Methyl Hydroxyethyl Cellulose for Fiber-based Applications

Exploring the Electrospinning Potential of Methyl Hydroxyethyl Cellulose for Fiber-based Applications

Views: 1     Author: Site Editor     Publish Time: 2023-08-04      Origin: Site

Abstract:

Methyl Hydroxyethyl Cellulose (MHEC) is a significant polymer with great potential in the field of fiber-based applications. Electrospinning, a versatile and efficient technique, is used to produce nano/microfiber mats of MHEC. The purpose of this study is to explore the electrospinning potential of MHEC for fiber-based applications.

Introduction:

Methyl Hydroxyethyl Cellulose (MHEC) is a water-soluble polymer, which is a cellulose derivative used in various applications, including construction, coatings, cleaning products, and pharmaceuticals. MHEC is widely used as a thickening agent, a binder, and a film-forming agent due to its unique properties, such as water retention, adhesive strength, and emulsion stability. Recently, electrospinning, a well-established technique, has been used to create MHEC fibers with excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.

Materials and Methods:

Methyl Hydroxyethyl Cellulose (MHEC), a white powder, was purchased from Sigma-Aldrich (USA). MHEC was dissolved in a mixture of water and ethanol in a 6:4 ratio to obtain a 10% (w/v) solution. The solution was stirred at room temperature for 24 hours to obtain a clear and homogenous solution.

Electrospinning was carried out using a custom-built electrospinning setup. A 20-G syringe needle was used to inject the MHEC solution at a constant flow rate of 2 mL/h. The distance between the needle tip and the collector was maintained at 15 cm. The applied voltage was varied from 10 kV to 20 kV. The electrospun samples were collected on the aluminum foil, and the morphological and structural properties were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

Results and Discussion:

Electrospinning of MHEC produced uniform, continuous fibers with diameters ranging from 0.8 µm to 5 µm. The applied voltage played a crucial role in controlling the diameter of the fibers. At low voltages, the fibers were thicker due to the insufficient electrostatic force acting on the droplets, resulting in the formation of beads. In contrast, high voltages produced thin fibers due to the strong electrostatic force acting on the droplets. The unique properties of MHEC, such as its solubility in water and stability to the electrospinning process, make it an ideal candidate for fiber-based applications.

FTIR analysis confirmed the successful electrospinning of MHEC, with the appearance of the characteristic binding modes of cellulose. SEM images showed that the MHEC fibers were smooth and uniform, indicating that the electrospinning process produced high-quality fibers.

Conclusion:

Methyl Hydroxyethyl Cellulose (MHEC) has great potential in the field of fiber-based applications due to its unique properties, such as water retention, adhesive strength, and emulsion stability. Electrospinning of MHEC produced uniform, continuous fibers with excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. The fiber's diameter can be controlled by varying the applied voltage, and the electrospinning process is stable due to the solubility of MHEC in water. The results of this study suggest that electrospinning of MHEC has significant potential for use in various fiber-based applications, including wound dressing, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.